fender flares and flex additive

Colors, replacement panels, paint, OEM and stock info.
Seats, hard/soft tops, gauges, dash, etc.

Moderator: Bfix Staff Members

Post Reply
User avatar
Stan
BFix Locked and Loaded
BFix Locked and Loaded
Posts: 3619
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 6:42 pm
Location: Boring Or

fender flares and flex additive

Post by Stan » Wed May 15, 2013 7:10 am

Got some new Gorilla warflares from WHs that i want to paint . Done some internet searching and a little talking to local paint shops - and have gotten some inconsistant advice -- Soo :) - thought maybe someone here has some to add. :lol:
I've heard ; flex additive to primer - flex additive to base coat - flex additive to clear coat - and flex additive to all three . -- ?? - any experience ? any reputable source i should ask?
Stan
When you come to a fork in the road - take it
Homer - " Facts are meaningless . You could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true."

oldwinghunter
BFix Locked and Loaded
BFix Locked and Loaded
Posts: 1131
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 7:08 pm

Post by oldwinghunter » Wed May 15, 2013 8:50 am

if it was me , i would do a good etching sealer..made specifically for plastics. . no primer... with all of the plastic front and rear bumpers these days, there are plenty of good flexible paints out there . there is a place in oregon city , called "rainbow finishes.".. they have everythng you need.
most people are absent,,, my merciful nature, and sense of fair play !

User avatar
STARKYPDX
BFix Locked and Loaded
BFix Locked and Loaded
Posts: 800
Joined: Thu Aug 29, 2002 9:37 pm
Location: Secret lab in Oregon

Post by STARKYPDX » Wed May 15, 2013 11:45 am

Take your flare to the shop I use in sandy. Find Greg in the paint shop and ask him. They may have what you need in house.
Broncohazard Godfather
'77 351w 5.5", 33" BFG MT, 4:11's & Locked

User avatar
Arsenio
BFix Locked and Loaded
BFix Locked and Loaded
Posts: 539
Joined: Fri Mar 29, 2002 11:49 pm
Location: St Helens Or

Post by Arsenio » Wed May 15, 2013 6:28 pm

you don't need flex additives... there is so much plastic on new cars you think they change paints at every panel? the answer is no they don't, they just don't use them, there not necessary. That is my opinion take if for what it is worth. I just painted that golf cart, there where no additives in that paint, that body flexed a lot putting it back on the frame no issues.

newer good paints are pretty very flexible, what i have learned though is you need to really clean them off well. There are special cleaners just for plastic, the usual wax and grease remover do not work well on plastics. Your better off with either an alcohol based cleaner are just a good detergent and water. You should also use an adhesive promoter. If you want some i can get you some i have almost a full can, its about 20 bucks a can if you have to buy it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FJjI6vWHPk
1970 FI 5.8,4r70w,fwhp44,9,airlockers,oba,35's not 5cents to my name.

User avatar
Arsenio
BFix Locked and Loaded
BFix Locked and Loaded
Posts: 539
Joined: Fri Mar 29, 2002 11:49 pm
Location: St Helens Or

Post by Arsenio » Wed May 15, 2013 7:01 pm

some more reading for ya stan,

Clean Is Good
Thorough cleaning of plastic prior to painting is basically similar for the bumper cover manufacturers and the body shops. At the OEM level, the people I spoke with all used an automated wash booth to ready their parts for painting. Using hot water and a special detergent designed for plastic, the parts are pulled through the wash booth on an overhead conveyor chain. First they’re washed with detergent, rinsed with water and then dried by both blowing and heating the clean parts. Finally, the parts are tack wiped and blown off to catch any dust prior to priming.

In the shop, the same thorough process must take place. In addition to the detergent wash and rinse, the shop could use an abrasive paste to lightly abrade the plastic as it’s being cleaned.

I heard conflicting advice about which type of wax and grease remover is the best choice. At issue is the difference between solvent-based and alcohol-based cleaners.

Traditional wax and grease removers are solvent-based (refined from petroleum) liquids. Solvent is readily absorbed into raw plastic.

Alcohol-based (distilled from grain) wax and grease removers aren’t easily absorbed into the plastic because they flash off faster. Theoretically they’d be perfect for final plastic cleaning. However, one leading coatings manufacturer suggested that the alcohol cleaners flashed off too quickly to do much good cleaning the surface, so they continue to recommend solvent cleaners even on raw plastic. Wipe on and wipe off immediately is their advice.

Another manufacturer suggested just using water-based (soap/detergent) cleaners in place of either solvent or alcohol types on bare plastic.

What should your shop do? In general, if you use traditional wax and grease removers on raw (open and unprimed) plastic, you should allow the solvent that was absorbed to evaporate back out. Don’t be in a rush to get on the next coat.

Specifically what your shop should do is follow your coating manufacturer’s directions. Every system has exact instructions; follow them to the letter for the best results.

Using Plastic Adhesion Promoters
One area absolutely everyone agreed on was the proper use of plastic adhesion promoters. They’re the perfect thing over bare, sanded plastic, and they’re the absolute wrong thing when applied over primer.

While the exact formula for an adhesion promoter varies from brand to brand, all versions contain a strong solvent that will open the pores of the plastic to enable the new coating to adhere to the raw plastic. Adhesion promoters also have a time window; they must flash off for a specific period to gain maximum inter-coat adhesion, but they must be painted over within a certain time, too. If left past the window of time, the plastic adhesion promoter doesn’t do the job it was supposed to.

Each manufacturer has specific directions about how many coats to apply to bare plastic and how long to wait before proceeding. Follow the directions for your brand exactly.

However, no plastic adhesion promoter is designed to be sandwiched between a primed or sealed substrate and the next coating. The rich solvents in the adhesion promoter will cause a loss of adhesion when used over primed or painted parts. In fact, one bumper cover manufacturer suggested that the most common problem they see is misused adhesion promoter. It’s for bare plastic, not painted plastic. In some repairs, this may mean masking the surrounding painted area or immediately wiping off the excess adhesion promoter to prevent later delamination.

These “magic” adhesion promoters are bad news if they’re applied over anything but clean, sanded, bare plastic.
1970 FI 5.8,4r70w,fwhp44,9,airlockers,oba,35's not 5cents to my name.

User avatar
Stan
BFix Locked and Loaded
BFix Locked and Loaded
Posts: 3619
Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 6:42 pm
Location: Boring Or

Post by Stan » Wed May 15, 2013 7:33 pm

Thanx for all the input - depending on how it turns out ; we'll let you know what method we used -- or not . :)
stan
I did find WHs paint instructions for their warflares - i'm thinking about following those. :) 8O
When you come to a fork in the road - take it
Homer - " Facts are meaningless . You could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true."

Post Reply